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relocating new hires

Lump Sums… A Moving Target

So, you just hired two great candidates for two new assistant manager positions in headquarters.  New Hire 1, we’ll call him Jim, is married with 2 kids.  New Hire 2, we’ll call her Mary, is single.  They both have about 800 miles to travel to their new location.  Your relocation policy for their job level allows for a lump sum of $6,000.

 

How’s that working for you? How does that make the transferee feel about their new job?

Three Issues to Tackle to Make the Relocation Decision Easier for Transferees

When it comes to relocation, I think we all want the same thing: an employee that is happy, focused and engaged in their work at the new location. With the ever-changing relocation environment and a less than ideal economy, however, many companies have made major cuts to policies offered to transferring employees. In addition to corporate changes, the same issues have led employees to evaluate relocation opportunities even more carefully than they have in the past. So, the question is, how can you design relocation policies to fit your company budget but also attract your necessary talent?

Generation Y and Relocation: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Relocating Gen Y Relocation is far more complex than I ever thought it would be.  Surely, the relocation benefits that HR offers to transferees at different levels (entry-level, new hire, senior management, etc.) are interesting, but lately I’ve been fascinated by how differently transferees across the generations approach relocation. It’s no secret that HR is still learning how to satisfy a multi-generational workforce  – and relocation is definitely one piece of that puzzle. I certainly can’t speak for every generation, but as one of two Millennials here I’ve been curious about Gen Y in the workplace and how my peers view relocation opportunities. As it turns out, I agree with Human Resource Executive when they say Millennials are the best candidates for relocation. But, as with anything, relocating this group does come with its challenges.

Is Your Recruiter Relocation Savvy?

Several months ago, I wrote a blog post on the importance of teamwork when it comes to relocating new hires. As a follow up to that post, today I want to talk a little about recruiters and what they should know about relocation to bring their A-game to the table.

Six Superbowl Lessons for Relocating New Hires

Coaching StaffWith the Superbowl right around the corner, it’s time to pay homage to teamwork. It amazes me how well coordinated some football teams are – especially when you think about all of the people that need to work together on game day. You’ve got an offensive coach, defensive coach, special teams coach, assistant coach, head coach and then, of course, the players. Surely, every coach and player has a different goal for the game  – and for themselves. Sometimes, these goals can even make or break their careers. So, how is it that this intricate web of leaders and players, all with different needs, can come together for a common purpose on game day?  

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RICK CALANNI
VP of Business Development Northeast Region

 

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